Summer Workshops

Early application deadline (no application fee):

  • May 4, 2018

Regular application deadlines:

  • June 1, 2018 for June workshops
  • July 6, 2018 for late July/early August workshops

Below are descriptions of the summer workshops CLEAR will offer in 2018. We like to offer a blend of new topics and "encore workshops," as well as varied lengths so you can choose the opportunities that best fit your schedule.

Apply for workshops by following the directions on our Application Procedure page.

 

Increasing proficiency through World Language Core Practices (Section 1)

  • Ms. Erin Parris-Dallia
  • Monday, June 25, 2018 - Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Looking to up your proficiency game? World Language Core Practices, recently published by ACTFL, are research-supported “teacher moves” that support language learners in gaining proficiency. The practices include using the target language, providing interpersonal communication tasks, employing functional goals and objectives, teaching grammar use in context, using authentic texts, and providing appropriate feedback. Participants in this two-day make-and-take workshop (an expanded version of last year's one-day) can expect to explore the reasoning behind World Language Core Practices, the how-to of using them, and spend time creating their own activities and/or plans for nurturing more proficient world language students.


Differentiated instruction in the language classroom

  • Dr. Julie Foss
  • Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Each of our students has different needs, levels of readiness, interests, learning styles, and motivations. This one-day workshop is designed to help language teachers meet the challenge of anticipating and responding to these differences. We will examine a variety of ways to differentiate content, process, and product in the language classroom, including planning differentiated units, lessons, activities, and assessments. You will begin putting some of these techniques into action by creating materials for your learners.


Real-life genres for teaching reading and writing: From nutrition labels to restaurant reviews

  • Dr. Charlene Polio
  • Thursday, June 28, 2018

Do you find that your textbooks contain uninspiring dialogs or mundane descriptions of daily routines? Do you have trouble creating writing assignments that move beyond simple narratives or five-paragraph essays? This workshop will use the notion of genre as its starting point: we will not look at literary genres but rather genres such as invitations, cereal boxes, menus, and news articles. We will focus on how to use authentic materials to teach reading for beginners by focusing on predictable genres, and how to help advanced students read more complex genres. Genres analysis will also be used to illustrate how to teach writing by focusing on conventions and context. Examples of activities and materials will be presented throughout the workshop for a range of levels and languages.


Proficiency-oriented games: How to make games useful and why

  • Dr. Anne Violin-Wigent
  • Friday, June 29, 2018

This workshop will encourage teachers to use games in the classroom as a means to develop proficiency and incorporate meaningful speaking into activities that are engaging for students at any level. In particular, we will focus on how games can provide a venue for meaningful exchange of information regardless of the level of students. After a brief description and explanation of what games have no value for the classroom, several pedagogically sound games will be presented and analyzed to determine how these games meet the Standards and include all three modes of communication (Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational).


Increasing proficiency through World Language Core Practices (Section 2)

  • Ms. Erin Parris-Dallia
  • Monday, July 30, 2018 - Tuesday, July 31, 2018

(REPEAT OF WORKSHOP FROM JUNE) Looking to up your proficiency game? World Language Core Practices, recently published by ACTFL, are research-supported “teacher moves” that support language learners in gaining proficiency. The practices include using the target language, providing interpersonal communication tasks, employing functional goals and objectives, teaching grammar use in context, using authentic texts, and providing appropriate feedback. Participants in this two-day make-and-take workshop (an expanded version of last year's one-day) can expect to explore the reasoning behind World Language Core Practices, the how-to of using them, and spend time creating their own activities and/or plans for nurturing more proficient world language students.


Maximizing target language use in classroom instruction

  • Ms. Melissa Dalton, CSCTFL 2017 Teacher of the Year
  • Wednesday, August 01, 2018 - Thursday, August 02, 2018

Would you like to start the school year with a sequence of target language-rich lessons, conducive to standards-based grading? Get a "90/10" makeover for your classroom during this two-day workshop. Build the foundation with a system to communicate expectations, reward positive process behaviors and develop a supportive classroom community. Participants will learn to recognize and adapt to critical psychological elements in the classroom, foster trust, and lead students to take risks – all key components that enhance proficiency. Benefit from step-by-step consultation throughout the development of instructional plans and apply strategies that can be gradually implemented throughout the school year.


 

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